Thursday , 21 February 2019
Home » Stop Diseases » Should We Have a ‘Celiac Safe’ Label?

Gluten-removed. Gluten-friendly. Gluten-conscious. All ridiculous terms made up by lazy companies that want to cash in on the gluten-free market without going the extra mile to keep those who can’t have any gluten from getting ill. But “gluten-free” is supposed to mean something. If something is labeled gluten-free, it should mean that it is safe […]

The post Should We Have a ‘Celiac Safe’ Label? appeared first on Gluten Dude.

Should We Have a ‘Celiac Safe’ Label?

Gluten-removed. Gluten-friendly. Gluten-conscious. All ridiculous terms made up by lazy companies that want to cash in on the gluten-free market without going the extra mile to keep those who can’t have any gluten from getting ill.

But “gluten-free” is supposed to mean something. If something is labeled gluten-free, it should mean that it is safe for the celiac and NCGS community, with as little risk as humanly possible.

Here’s how the FDA defines gluten-free, as of new labeling laws put in place in 2014.

In general, foods may be labeled “gluten-free” if they meet the definition and otherwise comply with the final rule’s requirements. More specifically, the final rule defines “gluten-free” as meaning that the food either is inherently gluten free; or does not contain an ingredient that is:

  1. a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat);
  2. derived from a gluten-containing grain that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or
  3. derived from a gluten-containing grain that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten in the food.

Also, any unavoidable presence of gluten in the food must be less than 20 ppm.

Is it me or did you have to read that a few times to fully understand it? Actually…don’t answer that. Or if you do, use one syllable words and very short sentences so I can comprehend it.

When Mrs. Dude or I go shopping, if it’s a new item we are picking up, the first thing we look for is the “gluten-free” label. And 9 out of 10 times, it means the product is safe and I breathe a sigh of relief. But then I’ll look at the back of the package and if it says it was made in a shared facility or shared equipment with gluten, I breathe a sigh of disappointment and it goes back on the shelf. It doesn’t necessarily mean the item wasn’t safe, but in my eyes it means there is more of a risk than I’m willing to take.

Now the frustrating part is adding “made in a facility (or shared equipment) that also processes gluten” to a product is completely voluntary. And the companies will always say they use best practices to minimize the risk. And I’m sure many do. But how do you know which ones cut corners?

Case in point: A few years back, I had quite an interesting back and forth with Bart’s Cookies after I claimed their gluten-free cookies should not be labeled gluten-free because the packaging says “may contain wheat” and the shared equipment looks like this after making a batch of non gluten-free cookies:

not gluten free

not gluten free

After Gluten-Free Watchdog got involved and tested their gluten-free cookies, the results showed they were over 500ppm, while Bart himself claimed the cookies were tested and were only 5.6ppm. Who are you going to believe? Oh…and after all of this, he then started telling people “If gluten is a serious health issue, I would not not chance our cookies.” No…he seriously said that and yet, his cookies are STILL labeled gluten-free.

We’d need a different word than “safe” simply because it would “guarantee” them to be safe and there are no guarantees in life (and it’s a lawsuit waiting to happen). But until we can come up with a better word, let’s use “celiac safe” for now. So what would a “celiac safe” label on a package mean? Here are my thoughts (and thanks to a fellow celiac named Matthew who got me thinking about this):

  • The product is made in a completely gluten-free facility.
  • All ingredients used in the product that are processed in other facilities are made in a completely gluten-free facility.
  • Regularly batch testing is mandatory and all batches must test below 10ppm. (I know 20ppm is legal and I’m not arguing against it, but I’d like to make “celiac safe” a bit more stringent.)

If the above steps were followed and the product was labeled “celiac safe”, I wouldn’t think twice about buying it. And how cool would that be?

Food without worrying. What a concept!

#NoCureNoChoice

Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

Check Also

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: Make family meals a reality, gut bacteria can prevent weight loss, and red meat wins in the context of a healthy diet

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: Make family meals a reality, gut bacteria can prevent weight loss, and red meat wins in the context of a healthy diet

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. This week make family meals a reality, gut bacteria can prevent weight loss, and red meat wins in the context of a healthy diet. Next week’s Mindful Meal Challenge will start again on Monday. Sign up now to join us! Too busy to […]

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: Foods that help depression and anxiety, how much exercise you need for lifelong youth, and how bad habits impact dad’s swimmers

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: Foods that help depression and anxiety, how much exercise you need for lifelong youth, and how bad habits impact dad’s swimmers

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. This week foods that help depression and anxiety, how much exercise you need for lifelong youth, and how bad habits impact dad’s swimmers. Next week’s Mindful Meal Challenge will start again on Monday. Sign up now to join us! Too busy to read […]

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: The benefits of eating early, alternative milks lose their status, and the best time to exercise

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: The benefits of eating early, alternative milks lose their status, and the best time to exercise

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. This week the benefits of eating early, alternative milks lose their status, and the best time to exercise. Next week’s Mindful Meal Challenge will start again on Monday. Sign up now to join us! Too busy to read them all? Try this awesome free […]

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: The road to sustainable seafood, dairy fat gets a pass, and oily fish delays menopause

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: The road to sustainable seafood, dairy fat gets a pass, and oily fish delays menopause

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. This week the road to sustainable seafood, dairy fat gets a pass, and oily fish delays menopause. Next week’s Mindful Meal Challenge will start again on Monday. Sign up now to join us! Too busy to read them all? Try this awesome free speed […]

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: The health value of friendship, the trouble with the carbohydrate-insulin model, and the sad state of the EPA

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: The health value of friendship, the trouble with the carbohydrate-insulin model, and the sad state of the EPA

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. This week the health value of friendship, the trouble with the carbohydrate-insulin model, and the sad state of the EPA. Next week’s Mindful Meal Challenge will start again on Monday. Sign up now to join us! Too busy to read them all? Try […]

Leave a Reply

css.php